IE Zine Fest

The IE Zine Fest brings together and support all aspects of the D.I.Y. community.
GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Ben Houston Moody.

 
Please, tell us a little bit about yourself as an artist.
 
 I do comics and illustration, have loved and been inspired by indie comics my entire life. I enjoy a diverse group of subject matters in my comics and try to include as many subversive meanings as possible.
 
 
Is there anything new you’re working on that you’re particularly excited about?
 
I have been working on several projects simultaneously, I am excited about all of them but am looking forward to some more historical occult projects in the future, based on accounts of medieval historians regarding the practices of witchcraft in Europe.
 
 
What can we expect when visiting your table at I.E. Zine Fest?
 
When visiting my table you can expect to see at least three different comics all wit-fully twisted all in their own respect. Spanning medieval era tales to classic noir written  by Jack Bennet and Illustrated by me.
 
 
 
Is there anything else you would like us to know?
 
When visiting my table you can expect to see at least three different comics all wit-fully twisted all in their own respect. Spanning medieval era tales to classic noir written  by Jack Bennet and Illustrated by me.

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Ben Houston Moody.

 

Please, tell us a little bit about yourself as an artist.

 

 I do comics and illustration, have loved and been inspired by indie comics my entire life. I enjoy a diverse group of subject matters in my comics and try to include as many subversive meanings as possible.

 

 

Is there anything new you’re working on that you’re particularly excited about?

 

I have been working on several projects simultaneously, I am excited about all of them but am looking forward to some more historical occult projects in the future, based on accounts of medieval historians regarding the practices of witchcraft in Europe.

 

 

What can we expect when visiting your table at I.E. Zine Fest?

 

When visiting my table you can expect to see at least three different comics all wit-fully twisted all in their own respect. Spanning medieval era tales to classic noir written  by Jack Bennet and Illustrated by me.

 

 

 

Is there anything else you would like us to know?

 

When visiting my table you can expect to see at least three different comics all wit-fully twisted all in their own respect. Spanning medieval era tales to classic noir written  by Jack Bennet and Illustrated by me.

Here is the official lineup for our 3rd annual IE Zine Quest.Art of WendAs IssuedCity MindfunkColor Ink BookDaisy NoemiDropkick DIYEric M. EsquivelFair DigFreeways CollideG.G. AlvaGirdle of VenusGrim IllustrationsGRIMM WIZARDHannah Nance PartlowHouston MoodyI Was A Teenage Filipino SkinheadInfluentza ZineJay, the illustratorJoel KatzJT SteinyKevin Uehlein ComicsLA Zine FestLemonade Press (includes: for our eyes only, WANGELA WRONG, & SEAMONSTER COMICS)Loaded SoundMariNaomiNew Noise MagazineNick BahulaOC Zine FestPerpetually Twelve Petty Cash ComixPop Ook comixPure Fun Skate ZineReflekt MagazineRocket Punch PiratesRotting FreshSam Grinberg CartoonsShavick DesignsShe’s not a morning personSleep TalkSmall Roar PressStacy Russo/ Wild Librarian BakerySticky RicksStill Life PressThe Secret HandshakeTori HolderYour Fathers Mustache Yumi Sakugawa

Here is the official lineup for our 3rd annual IE Zine Quest.

Art of Wend
As Issued
City Mindfunk
Color Ink Book
Daisy Noemi
Dropkick DIY
Eric M. Esquivel
Fair Dig
Freeways Collide
G.G. Alva
Girdle of Venus
Grim Illustrations
GRIMM WIZARD
Hannah Nance Partlow
Houston Moody
I Was A Teenage Filipino Skinhead
Influentza Zine
Jay, the illustrator
Joel Katz
JT Steiny
Kevin Uehlein Comics
LA Zine Fest
Lemonade Press (includes: for our eyes only, WANGELA WRONG, & SEAMONSTER COMICS)
Loaded Sound
MariNaomi
New Noise Magazine
Nick Bahula
OC Zine Fest
Perpetually Twelve 
Petty Cash Comix
Pop Ook comix
Pure Fun Skate Zine
Reflekt Magazine
Rocket Punch Pirates
Rotting Fresh
Sam Grinberg Cartoons
Shavick Designs
She’s not a morning person
Sleep Talk
Small Roar Press
Stacy Russo/ Wild Librarian Bakery
Sticky Ricks
Still Life Press
The Secret Handshake
Tori Holder
Your Fathers Mustache 
Yumi Sakugawa

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: MariNaomi.
 
As a child, was it your plan to become an artist?
 
According to an autobiography my kindergarten teacher made me write, my goal was to either be a writer or a “scientist of caterpillars.” Art was always something I just did for fun.
 
 
How has your art helped you evolve as a person?
 
Creating visual art calms me, whereas the writing/developing of a concept has helped me get to know myself better, and come to peace with things. Mostly, though, I just want to tell a good story.
 
 
Reading your blog and online zines, it is apparent that you are comfortable with your sexuality, have you always been this way?
 
According to my longtime friends, I’ve always been more comfortable with my sexuality than my peers were, especially in high school. But it’s all relative! I’ve always hated my body, for example. Me and every woman.
 
 
Please, tell us a little bit about what readers can expect from your upcoming zines.
 
My new book, Dragon’s Breath and Other True Stories, is a collection of comics that deal with some pretty heavy subjects (mortality, suicide, homelessness). To counterbalance this, I’ve created a zine of lighthearted slice-of-life comics called Said While Talking. At the time I was writing the darker stories, the Said While Talking strips kept me from falling into that endless bleak chasm.
 
Is there anything about I.E. Zine Fest that you are particularly excited about?

I’m excited to meet new people and see old pals. I’m not familiar with the area, so it’s exciting to go somewhere new. (I recently moved to Los Angeles after more than three decades in the SF Bay Area.)

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: MariNaomi.

 

As a child, was it your plan to become an artist?

 

According to an autobiography my kindergarten teacher made me write, my goal was to either be a writer or a “scientist of caterpillars.” Art was always something I just did for fun.

 

 

How has your art helped you evolve as a person?

 

Creating visual art calms me, whereas the writing/developing of a concept has helped me get to know myself better, and come to peace with things. Mostly, though, I just want to tell a good story.

 

 

Reading your blog and online zines, it is apparent that you are comfortable with your sexuality, have you always been this way?

 

According to my longtime friends, I’ve always been more comfortable with my sexuality than my peers were, especially in high school. But it’s all relative! I’ve always hated my body, for example. Me and every woman.

 

 

Please, tell us a little bit about what readers can expect from your upcoming zines.

 

My new book, Dragon’s Breath and Other True Stories, is a collection of comics that deal with some pretty heavy subjects (mortality, suicide, homelessness). To counterbalance this, I’ve created a zine of lighthearted slice-of-life comics called Said While Talking. At the time I was writing the darker stories, the Said While Talking strips kept me from falling into that endless bleak chasm.

 

Is there anything about I.E. Zine Fest that you are particularly excited about?

I’m excited to meet new people and see old pals. I’m not familiar with the area, so it’s exciting to go somewhere new. (I recently moved to Los Angeles after more than three decades in the SF Bay Area.)

Special shout out to @artofwend for the artwork on this years flyer. We look forward to seeing all our Zinester friends, and look forward to making new ones as well. #iezq #iezf #zinesters #zines #zinelife #zineparty #diyordie

Special shout out to @artofwend for the artwork on this years flyer. We look forward to seeing all our Zinester friends, and look forward to making new ones as well. #iezq #iezf #zinesters #zines #zinelife #zineparty #diyordie


GET YO KNOW YOUR VENDOR. Emma Shavick (Shavick Designs) 
 
Please, give us a brief introduction of yourself.
 
Shavick Designs print shop is LA-based; I love all forms of analogue and like to experiment with different personal projects in my zine work. I also curate a group zine called Muholland Mystery Factory, Issues 1-3 showcase work from artists working in different mediums across the globe. 
 
You have an impressive client list. What are your strategies in gettingyour work seen?
 
I do my best to be proactive. As a freelance designer I think it’s important to work towards creating a body of work that identifies with your style and point of view, so I try to reach out to clients and brands that I think I would collaborate well with on a design project.
 
How do you develop ideas for your work?
 
My working methodology is very process-orientated. I like to keep things fluid, I brainstorm and make paginations for my zines, but I leave lot’s of room to see where my work takes me as it unfolds. 
 
Do you have a favorite series/ piece?
 
I’m always working on a few projects at once and always ready to jump into another, so I am usually most excited about whatever I’m currently working on or my next project idea. 
 
 
Is there anything else you would like us toknow?
 
If you were thinking about rescuing an animal, you totally should!!

GET YO KNOW YOUR VENDOR. Emma Shavick (Shavick Designs)

 

Please, give us a brief introduction of yourself.

 

Shavick Designs print shop is LA-based; I love all forms of analogue and like to experiment with different personal projects in my zine work. I also curate a group zine called Muholland Mystery Factory, Issues 1-3 showcase work from artists working in different mediums across the globe. 

 

You have an impressive client list. What are your strategies in gettingyour work seen?

 

I do my best to be proactive. As a freelance designer I think it’s important to work towards creating a body of work that identifies with your style and point of view, so I try to reach out to clients and brands that I think I would collaborate well with on a design project.

 

How do you develop ideas for your work?

 

My working methodology is very process-orientated. I like to keep things fluid, I brainstorm and make paginations for my zines, but I leave lot’s of room to see where my work takes me as it unfolds.

 

Do you have a favorite series/ piece?

 

I’m always working on a few projects at once and always ready to jump into another, so I am usually most excited about whatever I’m currently working on or my next project idea.

 

 

Is there anything else you would like us toknow?

 

If you were thinking about rescuing an animal, you totally should!!

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR. 

Jeff Kubasak (Common Genus)
 
What is the earliest memory you have of drawing? Did you have a moment of eureka when your style came about or are you just THAT good?
 
My mom and dad just moved from Los Angeles to Spokane, Wa, so they had the fun chore of moving out of the house we’d lived in for 20 plus years.  My mom found a bunch of old drawings I had made as a small boy (kindergarten-era). there’s plenty in that bunch that look like typical, disillusioned crayon doodles you might see from a youngster.  houses, bugs, girls, adorable spelling and my name pretty big in a corner.  although that isn’t a memory, I guess the earliest one I have in my head is trying to copy some poster art from ‘heavy metal’, the movie.  I was really into how the line work displays elements of spatial objects. although I knew it was 2-D I always imagined them being 3-D.  oh, I’m really off topic.  my style certainly tightened up, mostly since I was buying different pens to draw with. my style is a constant work on progress, I wouldn’t say I’m very good.  you just gotta make the most of what you’ve got sometime…  right?
 
 
Name a few of your favorite zines.
long-running: perpetually twelve.  I know mchank now, but getting to look back at his work over the years really made me comfortable in making a zine that I wanna read.  not trying to commercialize or alter my material to try and get more followers.  let’s be honest, no one is in the zine business for money.
 
others: (since I’ll write for way too long here) everything out of Fudge Factory Comics, punks git cut, Brendan Monroe’s work, the fragile gang, ‘how to talk I your cat about gun control’, anything by artists I’m into.  andrew Jeffrey wright has some pretty awesome stuff.  
 
 
Which of YOUR zines is your favorite?
 
which ever one is next…  I love all of the old ones, but for a while there I was operating ‘business as usual’ and I lost the excitement of making a zine.  now I’m making them whenever I feel good about it.  I was lucky enough to have time for a few years to make one on a monthly basis, and now I’m probably going to get 4 out in a year. I don’t want to lose the ‘why’ in ‘why not?’…

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR.

Jeff Kubasak (Common Genus)

 

What is the earliest memory you have of drawing? Did you have a moment of eureka when your style came about or are you just THAT good?

 

My mom and dad just moved from Los Angeles to Spokane, Wa, so they had the fun chore of moving out of the house we’d lived in for 20 plus years.  My mom found a bunch of old drawings I had made as a small boy (kindergarten-era). there’s plenty in that bunch that look like typical, disillusioned crayon doodles you might see from a youngster.  houses, bugs, girls, adorable spelling and my name pretty big in a corner.  although that isn’t a memory, I guess the earliest one I have in my head is trying to copy some poster art from ‘heavy metal’, the movie.  I was really into how the line work displays elements of spatial objects. although I knew it was 2-D I always imagined them being 3-D.  oh, I’m really off topic.  my style certainly tightened up, mostly since I was buying different pens to draw with. my style is a constant work on progress, I wouldn’t say I’m very good.  you just gotta make the most of what you’ve got sometime…  right?

 

 

Name a few of your favorite zines.

long-running: perpetually twelve.  I know mchank now, but getting to look back at his work over the years really made me comfortable in making a zine that I wanna read.  not trying to commercialize or alter my material to try and get more followers.  let’s be honest, no one is in the zine business for money.

 

others: (since I’ll write for way too long here) everything out of Fudge Factory Comics, punks git cut, Brendan Monroe’s work, the fragile gang, ‘how to talk I your cat about gun control’, anything by artists I’m into.  andrew Jeffrey wright has some pretty awesome stuff.  

 

 

Which of YOUR zines is your favorite?

 

which ever one is next…  I love all of the old ones, but for a while there I was operating ‘business as usual’ and I lost the excitement of making a zine.  now I’m making them whenever I feel good about it.  I was lucky enough to have time for a few years to make one on a monthly basis, and now I’m probably going to get 4 out in a year. I don’t want to lose the ‘why’ in ‘why not?’…


GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR. Gabriela Levitt (GRIMM WIZARD)
Please give us a brief description of your work.Experimental? At least it feels like it is. It’s just silly illustrations really influenced by 90’s television and movies.
What are your top three favorite horror movies?Kill List is my all time favorite, followed by Event Horizon and Evil Dead II.
Tell us a little about your ongoing “High School” series.I didn’t go to a conventional high school so I just kind of became obsessed with the traditions and rituals that I feel go along with normal high school. Watching Buffy the Vampire Slayer really pushed those ideas into my head. Plus it really ties into the subject of horror pretty seamlessly.
You work with a wide range of medium, if you had to choose one, which would it be?No. 2 pencil. or gouache, it’s a tie.
Is there anything you’d like I.E. Zine Fest attendees to know before hitting up your booth?I’m just really into spooky things. I’ll probably be eating candy corn. I always want to talk about horror stuff. Always.

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR. Gabriela Levitt (GRIMM WIZARD)

Please give us a brief description of your work.
Experimental? At least it feels like it is. It’s just silly illustrations really influenced by 90’s television and movies.


What are your top three favorite horror movies?
Kill List is my all time favorite, followed by Event Horizon and Evil Dead II.


Tell us a little about your ongoing “High School” series.
I didn’t go to a conventional high school so I just kind of became obsessed with the traditions and rituals that I feel go along with normal high school. Watching Buffy the Vampire Slayer really pushed those ideas into my head. Plus it really ties into the subject of horror pretty seamlessly.


You work with a wide range of medium, if you had to choose one, which would it be?
No. 2 pencil. or gouache, it’s a tie.


Is there anything you’d like I.E. Zine Fest attendees to know before hitting up your booth?
I’m just really into spooky things. I’ll probably be eating candy corn. I always want to talk about horror stuff. Always.

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR. Stacy Russo/Wild Librarian Bakery.


Please, give us a brief introduction of your zine The Barefoot Librarian.
 
The Barefoot Librarian is my latest poetry zine. It is different from the others, since it is themed: all of the poems are about librarians. Although they are imaginary, the characters are very real to me and I love each one of them. I can see how they look, where they work/live, etc. 
 
What about your work as a zinester makes you most proud?
 
Some people have told me that my writing has inspired them to write. Above all else, this makes me the most happy.
 
Tell us a little about your love for Henry Rollins. :)
 
What a great question! Henry has been a thing for me since I was a teenager in the 1980s, so through Black Flag and later Rollins Band. I’ve seen him perform a lot and read his books while growing up. He has always been a source of strength and inspiration for me. When I would see him as a teenager and young woman, I would think, “I’m going to be like him!” Sometimes when I’ve hit hard times or felt afraid, I’ve thought of him. I’m thankful that I’ve been able to share all of this with him - to tell him what he has meant to me. He is one of my male feminist heroes. 
 
Has anyone ever written you a love poem?
 
Yes, beautiful ones, but, alas, only from ex-boyfriends years later. I’m happy they still think of me so positively, but their gifts arrived too late. 
 
 
Name a few books you think most zine lovers would enjoy.
 
This is hard, but I think a lot of zine lovers would appreciate books about creativity and love - books that feed the soul. Three of my favorites are Women Who Run With the Wolves by Clarissa Pinkola Estes, All About Love by bell hooks, and Communion: The Female Search for Love by bell hooks. I’m currently reading a great book titled Art & Fear: Observations on The Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking by David Bayles & Ted Orland.

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR. Stacy Russo/Wild Librarian Bakery.

Please, give us a brief introduction of your zine The Barefoot Librarian.

 

The Barefoot Librarian is my latest poetry zine. It is different from the others, since it is themed: all of the poems are about librarians. Although they are imaginary, the characters are very real to me and I love each one of them. I can see how they look, where they work/live, etc. 

 

What about your work as a zinester makes you most proud?

 

Some people have told me that my writing has inspired them to write. Above all else, this makes me the most happy.

 

Tell us a little about your love for Henry Rollins. :)

 

What a great question! Henry has been a thing for me since I was a teenager in the 1980s, so through Black Flag and later Rollins Band. I’ve seen him perform a lot and read his books while growing up. He has always been a source of strength and inspiration for me. When I would see him as a teenager and young woman, I would think, “I’m going to be like him!” Sometimes when I’ve hit hard times or felt afraid, I’ve thought of him. I’m thankful that I’ve been able to share all of this with him - to tell him what he has meant to me. He is one of my male feminist heroes. 

 

Has anyone ever written you a love poem?

 

Yes, beautiful ones, but, alas, only from ex-boyfriends years later. I’m happy they still think of me so positively, but their gifts arrived too late. 

 

 

Name a few books you think most zine lovers would enjoy.

 

This is hard, but I think a lot of zine lovers would appreciate books about creativity and love - books that feed the soul. Three of my favorites are Women Who Run With the Wolves by Clarissa Pinkola Estes, All About Love by bell hooks, and Communion: The Female Search for Love by bell hooks. I’m currently reading a great book titled Art & Fear: Observations on The Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking by David Bayles & Ted Orland.

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR. Kevin Uehlein Comics. 
How long have you been in the zine-making business? How and when did you get your start?
I started self-publishing mini comics in late 2007.  I had been reading a lot of comics and getting interested in making my own.  A friend and I decided to each have a comic made in time for the Stumptown Comics Fest in 2008.    
 
Do you have any rules that you’ve laid down for yourself as an artist?
I have a ‘daily deadline,’ where I have to draw and post something on my blog, even if it’s a simple sketchbook drawing.  It helps prevent long stretches of not drawing. 
 
 
Please, tell us a little about your experience at the Center for Cartoon Studies.
I’m very thankful to have attended the Center for Cartoon Studies, it was the perfect curriculum for my intense interest in comics.  I especially learned a lot in the subjects of design, comics history, business practices, composition, and organizing a comics story.  I also made a lot of really good friends, who keep me inspired to produce quality work as I keep track of them online.    
 
 
Who is your favorite Cartoonists of all time and why?
It’s hard to name just one, but that’s the question, so I’ll say Kim Deitch.  I’m very inspired by his work ethic, visual approach, and deeply-layered stories, as well as his improvement/maturation as he ages.  I also think he’s criminally under-known, outside of the world of indie comics.   
 
 
What about I.E. Zine Fest are you most excited about?

I haven’t been to this show yet, so I guess seeing it.  I like meeting folks and trading/selling comics and zines. 

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR. Kevin Uehlein Comics.

How long have you been in the zine-making business? How and when did you get your start?

I started self-publishing mini comics in late 2007.  I had been reading a lot of comics and getting interested in making my own.  A friend and I decided to each have a comic made in time for the Stumptown Comics Fest in 2008.   

 

Do you have any rules that you’ve laid down for yourself as an artist?

I have a ‘daily deadline,’ where I have to draw and post something on my blog, even if it’s a simple sketchbook drawing.  It helps prevent long stretches of not drawing.

 

 

Please, tell us a little about your experience at the Center for Cartoon Studies.

I’m very thankful to have attended the Center for Cartoon Studies, it was the perfect curriculum for my intense interest in comics.  I especially learned a lot in the subjects of design, comics history, business practices, composition, and organizing a comics story.  I also made a lot of really good friends, who keep me inspired to produce quality work as I keep track of them online.   

 

 

Who is your favorite Cartoonists of all time and why?

It’s hard to name just one, but that’s the question, so I’ll say Kim Deitch.  I’m very inspired by his work ethic, visual approach, and deeply-layered stories, as well as his improvement/maturation as he ages.  I also think he’s criminally under-known, outside of the world of indie comics.   

 

 

What about I.E. Zine Fest are you most excited about?

I haven’t been to this show yet, so I guess seeing it.  I like meeting folks and trading/selling comics and zines.