IE Zine Fest

The IE Zine Fest brings together and support all aspects of the D.I.Y. community.
Join us this Sunday October 26th from 12-5pm for our 3rd annual #IEZineQuest. This years participating vendors include: 
Art of Wend
As Issued
City Mindfunk
Color Ink Book
Daisy Noemi
Dropkick DIY
Eric M. Esquivel
Fair Dig
Freeways Collide
G.G. Alva
Girdle of Venus
Grim Illustrations
GRIMM WIZARD
Hannah Nance Partlow
Houston Moody
I Was A Teenage Filipino Skinhead
Influentza Zine
Jay, the illustrator
Joel Katz
JT Steiny
Kevin Uehlein Comics
LA Zine Fest
Lemonade Press (includes: for our eyes only, WANGELA WRONG, & SEAMONSTER COMICS)
Loaded Sound
MariNaomi
New Noise Magazine
Nick Bahula
OC Zine Fest
Perpetually Twelve 
Petty Cash Comix
Pop Ook comix
Pure Fun Skate Zine
Reflekt Magazine
Rocket Punch Pirates
Rotting Fresh
Sam Grinberg Cartoons
Shavick Designs
She’s not a morning person
Sleep Talk
Small Roar Press
Stacy Russo/ Wild Librarian Bakery
Sticky Ricks
Still Life Press
The Secret Handshake
Tori Holder
Your Fathers Mustache 
Yumi Sakugawa

Join us this Sunday October 26th from 12-5pm for our 3rd annual #IEZineQuest. This years participating vendors include: 

Art of Wend

As Issued

City Mindfunk

Color Ink Book

Daisy Noemi

Dropkick DIY

Eric M. Esquivel

Fair Dig

Freeways Collide

G.G. Alva

Girdle of Venus

Grim Illustrations

GRIMM WIZARD

Hannah Nance Partlow

Houston Moody

I Was A Teenage Filipino Skinhead

Influentza Zine

Jay, the illustrator

Joel Katz

JT Steiny

Kevin Uehlein Comics

LA Zine Fest

Lemonade Press (includes: for our eyes only, WANGELA WRONG, & SEAMONSTER COMICS)

Loaded Sound

MariNaomi

New Noise Magazine

Nick Bahula

OC Zine Fest

Perpetually Twelve 

Petty Cash Comix

Pop Ook comix

Pure Fun Skate Zine

Reflekt Magazine

Rocket Punch Pirates

Rotting Fresh

Sam Grinberg Cartoons

Shavick Designs

She’s not a morning person

Sleep Talk

Small Roar Press

Stacy Russo/ Wild Librarian Bakery

Sticky Ricks

Still Life Press

The Secret Handshake

Tori Holder

Your Fathers Mustache 

Yumi Sakugawa

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Pop Ook Comix!Please, tell us a little bit about Pop Ook Comix. Pop Ook is a semi annual comic/music zine….I (Hamo Bahnam) edit publish stamp staple hand-print glue tape fold bend tear destory fuck up manipulate mail and fail to mail contribute sweat lose money cut my fingers and cry alone till the damn thing’s done. I also am the janitorial staff at the offices of Pop Ook… Contributors are people ive known for years or others that have crossed my path and i find there work to be wonderful. Each issue of Pop Ook is multifacited…it may include pullouts mini zines extra flaps etc etc… all covers are hand printed in multi colors and are done by myself with stencils and linolium blocks. All copies come with a cd of the latest modern pop hits and is suitable for all members of the family..that includes fido!!! The music is excelent for dancing in a 2’x2’ box!! We’re on our 2nd issue a third may or may not be ready for the L.A. Zine fest in 2015…
Can you give us a brief description of your latest/upcoming issue?  comix comix comix music music music!!! Pop Ook!! is Paper Plastic Sound and Vision…. I hope you like it!! Name a few of your favorite zines. Post Care/ Truck Face/ Eyeball Burp/ anything by Rusty Jordan!!Do you have any rules you’ve laid down for yourself as an artist? I expect quality over quantity for myself. I’m very critical of my output and have the same expectations of my contributors. I know its hard for people to spend money on zines when the rent is due, so I try to put out the best products that leave people with no doubt about their purchase. What can we expect when visiting your booth at I.E. Zine Fest? oh man, what to expect…hahaha lots and lots of good stuff!! I don’t have much merchandise but we offer a lot of down home goodness!! maybe a hug.

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Pop Ook Comix!

Please, tell us a little bit about Pop Ook Comix.

Pop Ook is a semi annual comic/music zine….I (Hamo Bahnam) edit publish stamp staple hand-print glue tape fold bend tear destory fuck up manipulate mail and fail to mail contribute sweat lose money cut my fingers and cry alone till the damn thing’s done. I also am the janitorial staff at the offices of Pop Ook… Contributors are people ive known for years or others that have crossed my path and i find there work to be wonderful. Each issue of Pop Ook is multifacited…it may include pullouts mini zines extra flaps etc etc… all covers are hand printed in multi colors and are done by myself with stencils and linolium blocks. All copies come with a cd of the latest modern pop hits and is suitable for all members of the family..that includes fido!!! The music is excelent for dancing in a 2’x2’ box!! We’re on our 2nd issue a third may or may not be ready for the L.A. Zine fest in 2015…

Can you give us a brief description of your latest/upcoming issue?

comix comix comix music music music!!! Pop Ook!! is Paper Plastic Sound and Vision…. I hope you like it!!

Name a few of your favorite zines.

Post Care/ Truck Face/ Eyeball Burp/ anything by Rusty Jordan!!

Do you have any rules you’ve laid down for yourself as an artist?

I expect quality over quantity for myself. I’m very critical of my output and have the same expectations of my contributors. I know its hard for people to spend money on zines when the rent is due, so I try to put out the best products that leave people with no doubt about their purchase.

What can we expect when visiting your booth at I.E. Zine Fest?

oh man, what to expect…hahaha lots and lots of good stuff!! I don’t have much merchandise but we offer a lot of down home goodness!! maybe a hug.

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Iris Jong of Lemonade Press.
Please, give us a brief introduction of yourself.I’m a recent college grad who found out a year into her fancy corporate gig that the business world wasn’t what she had dreamed it would be. I’m still working a full-time corporate job, but now I’m dedicating as much time as I can to boosting my drawing/illustration abilities, with the goal of being a creative professional one day. What inspires the cinematic quality of your illustrations?This is a recent development, and one I’m still trying to expand further. My favorite thing about drawing is being able to translate imagined worlds and characters into a kind of material reality. I’m not satisfied simply producing a pretty picture— I’m interested in using drawing as a tool for storytelling and communication, whether it’s through illustration, comics, or concept art/visual development. What advice would you give aspiring illustrators?I’m still very much an aspiring illustrator, but here’s some advice I’m trying to follow myself: 
Draw, a lot. Measure how much you draw, not how well, because the latter inevitably follows the former
Don’t worry about messing up, and don’t be precious about your drawings. Failure leads to improvement and innovation 
Don’t pin your sense of accomplishment to social media metrics
Do you have any rules you’ve laid down for yourself as an artist?Only quantitative ones! I’m aiming to spend 800 hours drawing this year, and so far, I’ve been on track. Is there anything else you would like us to know?I’m looking forward to the show!

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Iris Jong of Lemonade Press.


Please, give us a brief introduction of yourself.

I’m a recent college grad who found out a year into her fancy corporate gig that the business world wasn’t what she had dreamed it would be. I’m still working a full-time corporate job, but now I’m dedicating as much time as I can to boosting my drawing/illustration abilities, with the goal of being a creative professional one day. 

What inspires the cinematic quality of your illustrations?

This is a recent development, and one I’m still trying to expand further. My favorite thing about drawing is being able to translate imagined worlds and characters into a kind of material reality. I’m not satisfied simply producing a pretty picture— I’m interested in using drawing as a tool for storytelling and communication, whether it’s through illustration, comics, or concept art/visual development. 

What advice would you give aspiring illustrators?

I’m still very much an aspiring illustrator, but here’s some advice I’m trying to follow myself: 

  • Draw, a lot. Measure how much you draw, not how well, because the latter inevitably follows the former
  • Don’t worry about messing up, and don’t be precious about your drawings. Failure leads to improvement and innovation 
  • Don’t pin your sense of accomplishment to social media metrics


Do you have any rules you’ve laid down for yourself as an artist?

Only quantitative ones! I’m aiming to spend 800 hours drawing this year, and so far, I’ve been on track. 

Is there anything else you would like us to know?

I’m looking forward to the show!

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Sara Todd (Freeways Collide).
Please, give us a brief introduction of yourself.
Freeways Collide (FWC) is an independent art & design studio based in Long Beach, California and Antwerp, Belgium. First established by Lowell Ong and Sara Todd in 2009 as an experimental website, it quickly turned into a collaborative effort amongst their friends; a set of artists, designers, musicians, and many other eclectic folks from around the world. By 2012, FWC opened up shop in Long Beach, California and started publishing small art books, zines, and posters.
How did the name “Freeways Collide” come about?
Lowell was stoned and drunk one night in 2007 and we were talking and he just blurted it out. I don’t know where it came from. He just makes up random shit in his head all the time, so it wasn’t unusual. But the name stuck. I think it had to do with him being in numerous car accidents before though. Like, near-death car accidents. But he’ll say the name came from some bullshit about ideas and cars and people and whatever. But I think that’s bull.
What is it about photography that inspires you?
The whole medium is just so interesting, cameras are these little magical machines. I need to see soul and love, that’s when I’m inspired. I once cried looking at a photograph from Wolfgang Tillmans and it wasn’t cause it was sad, it was just so mesmerizing. 
What can we expect when visiting your booth at I.E. Zine Fest?
Lots of awesome zines! No but seriously you’ll find mostly photography but we also have been venturing into more graphic things and poetry. We’ll also have some cute buttons!

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Sara Todd (Freeways Collide).

Please, give us a brief introduction of yourself.

Freeways Collide (FWC) is an independent art & design studio based in Long Beach, California and Antwerp, Belgium. First established by Lowell Ong and Sara Todd in 2009 as an experimental website, it quickly turned into a collaborative effort amongst their friends; a set of artists, designers, musicians, and many other eclectic folks from around the world. By 2012, FWC opened up shop in Long Beach, California and started publishing small art books, zines, and posters.

How did the name “Freeways Collide” come about?

Lowell was stoned and drunk one night in 2007 and we were talking and he just blurted it out. I don’t know where it came from. He just makes up random shit in his head all the time, so it wasn’t unusual. But the name stuck. I think it had to do with him being in numerous car accidents before though. Like, near-death car accidents. But he’ll say the name came from some bullshit about ideas and cars and people and whatever. But I think that’s bull.

What is it about photography that inspires you?

The whole medium is just so interesting, cameras are these little magical machines. I need to see soul and love, that’s when I’m inspired. I once cried looking at a photograph from Wolfgang Tillmans and it wasn’t cause it was sad, it was just so mesmerizing. 

What can we expect when visiting your booth at I.E. Zine Fest?

Lots of awesome zines! No but seriously you’ll find mostly photography but we also have been venturing into more graphic things and poetry. We’ll also have some cute buttons!

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Pure Fun.

Please give us a brief introduction of your zine, “Pure Fun.”

Pure Fun is a skateboarding zine that my friend Eric and I originally started in the Summer of 1990. We covered our local and surrounding scenes with photographs, articles, interviews, reviews and more. Nothing very original… very much along the lines of other skate zines that I had from the 1980s and inspired by two other local zines, Taking Flight and Awake.

What was it like bringing the zine back after such a long hiatus?

It’s been a lot of fun and it’s been great to connect with new people and reconnect with old friends. When I originally brought the zine back two years ago, I only planned for it to be a one off… The final issue to cap off all the fun from the original issues. But the project never went away for me. I was consistantly getting mailorders for the next two years and people started asking when the next one was coming out so that started to put ideas in my head. Plus, I always need projects and stuff to tinker around with so I just released a new issue last month.
 
The zine has received an impressive amount of recognition, what is that like for you?

It’s been great! A great feeling. People have been stoked on the new issue and the overall project in general, so they’ve been nice to help me spread the word with reviews, articles, radio show appearances and more.

Issue #11 was just recently published, when can we expect #12?

Issue #12 with be out next summer for the zine’s 25th anniversary. There will be another release party and some other special projects to coinside with issue 12. Stay tuned.
 
Is there anything else you’d like us to know?

I’m looking forward to being at the IE Zine Fest. I’ve never vended at a zine fair before so this will be a fun, new expeience and I am looking forward to meeting everyone… from the other zinsters to all the people just coming to check it out. Big thanks to Ray for all his hard work in putting this cool event together. See you all on the 26th!

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Pure Fun.

Please give us a brief introduction of your zine, “Pure Fun.”
Pure Fun is a skateboarding zine that my friend Eric and I originally started in the Summer of 1990. We covered our local and surrounding scenes with photographs, articles, interviews, reviews and more. Nothing very original… very much along the lines of other skate zines that I had from the 1980s and inspired by two other local zines, Taking Flight and Awake.
What was it like bringing the zine back after such a long hiatus?
It’s been a lot of fun and it’s been great to connect with new people and reconnect with old friends. When I originally brought the zine back two years ago, I only planned for it to be a one off… The final issue to cap off all the fun from the original issues. But the project never went away for me. I was consistantly getting mailorders for the next two years and people started asking when the next one was coming out so that started to put ideas in my head. Plus, I always need projects and stuff to tinker around with so I just released a new issue last month.

 

The zine has received an impressive amount of recognition, what is that like for you?
It’s been great! A great feeling. People have been stoked on the new issue and the overall project in general, so they’ve been nice to help me spread the word with reviews, articles, radio show appearances and more.
Issue #11 was just recently published, when can we expect #12?
Issue #12 with be out next summer for the zine’s 25th anniversary. There will be another release party and some other special projects to coinside with issue 12. Stay tuned.

 

Is there anything else you’d like us to know?
I’m looking forward to being at the IE Zine Fest. I’ve never vended at a zine fair before so this will be a fun, new expeience and I am looking forward to meeting everyone… from the other zinsters to all the people just coming to check it out. Big thanks to Ray for all his hard work in putting this cool event together. See you all on the 26th!
GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Nick Bahula. 
Please, give us a brief introduction of yourself.My name is Nick Bahula. I run the Free Arts Movement and I am a member of Collaboration X. You use a wide range of materials and processes for your art, if you had to choose one, what would it be and why?A fat brush and watercolor will always be my go to. Dripping paint on canvas has always brought me the most happiness.Would you mind telling us a little bit about work that you are currently working on?For the past few years I have been making photo transfers on wood. I leave wood photo blocks around for people to find. If you follow me on Instagram I leave photo clues. A little less then a year ago I made up a @freeartsmovement account and stated using #freeartsmovement to spread the word of other rad people dropping free art around the world.What can we expect when vising your booth at I.E. Zine Fest?I will have some collaboration zines made on wood as well as some photo blocks. I will be doing a transfer demo with people.Is there anything else that you would like us to know?I will be hiding free art from myself and some others during the DTR Artwalk and posting clues on IG and Twitter at Bahula

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Nick Bahula. 

Please, give us a brief introduction of yourself.

My name is Nick Bahula. I run the Free Arts Movement and I am a member of Collaboration X. 

You use a wide range of materials and processes for your art, if you had to choose one, what would it be and why?

A fat brush and watercolor will always be my go to. Dripping paint on canvas has always brought me the most happiness.

Would you mind telling us a little bit about work that you are currently working on?

For the past few years I have been making photo transfers on wood. I leave wood photo blocks around for people to find. If you follow me on Instagram I leave photo clues. A little less then a year ago I made up a @freeartsmovement account and stated using #freeartsmovement to spread the word of other rad people dropping free art around the world.

What can we expect when vising your booth at I.E. Zine Fest?

I will have some collaboration zines made on wood as well as some photo blocks. I will be doing a transfer demo with people.

Is there anything else that you would like us to know?

I will be hiding free art from myself and some others during the DTR Artwalk and posting clues on IG and Twitter at Bahula

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Sarah Venus the Trickster.
 
 
 
Could you please give us a small introduction of what your zine, Girdle of Venus.
 My zine is called ” Venus the trickster”.
 
It just a continuing narrative following an individual hero’s quest, and how it evolves and adapts to the different stages of life.
It’s written and illustrated just like a folk tale, each character is based on various characters in my life. The characters change with the relationships they came from, and sort of construct their own story that way.
 
 
 Explain your process when coming up with content for new issues.
Really, it is just a way to talk to the people I love.
 
 
How long have you been a zine maker and how did you start?
I have been making zines for many years. It is an excellent format to channel all those stray thoughts or ideas into something tangible. I love to tell stories.
 
 
What is the best and worst part of being a zinester?
I don’t know about the worst part, but the best part about making zines is the community and the collaboration.
All of my future plans as an artist involve reaching more audiences and expanding media.

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Sarah Venus the Trickster.

 

 

 

Could you please give us a small introduction of what your zine, Girdle of Venus.

 My zine is called ” Venus the trickster”.

 

It just a continuing narrative following an individual hero’s quest, and how it evolves and adapts to the different stages of life.

It’s written and illustrated just like a folk tale, each character is based on various characters in my life. The characters change with the relationships they came from, and sort of construct their own story that way.

 

 

 Explain your process when coming up with content for new issues.

Really, it is just a way to talk to the people I love.

 

 

How long have you been a zine maker and how did you start?

I have been making zines for many years. It is an excellent format to channel all those stray thoughts or ideas into something tangible. I love to tell stories.

 

 

What is the best and worst part of being a zinester?

I don’t know about the worst part, but the best part about making zines is the community and the collaboration.

All of my future plans as an artist involve reaching more audiences and expanding media.

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Fair Dig Press.

 

Fair Dig Press is a very interesting name, how did it come about?

 

Thank you, I’m glad it sparks interest! Back when I played music in Phoenix, my photographer friend Jenny Hunter took some publicity photos of me outside an abandoned house. I found a shovel on the ground and posed with it over my shoulder, with one of my lyrics in mind about shovels and holes in the desert in mind. (My songs were… dark.) So I kept that motif in mind when I was trying to come up with a label to slap on my next creative endeavor. I researched idioms and found that “fair dig” is Irish slang for a fight or for a fair punch (like, the opposite of a cheap shot). Since my first zine was about learning to cagefight - or trying to learn before getting injured - it seemed like an appropriate fit. And then when I decided to expand my publishing ambitions beyond just my own writing, and start putting out authors, I decided to keep the name attached to it.

 

Is Fair Dig the first and only zine you have created?  If so when and how did it come about?

 

It is the first I created, though not the first I’ve written for. I wrote submissions for other zines for a while, and did interviews for an alt-comedy zine called MODEST PROPOSAL. I read a lot more zines than I actually wrote for, but a few years back I got involved in promoting L.A. Zine Fest through my podcast Shakeytown Radio, and started volunteering for them. I was inspired to start writing my own zine, and used the story of my fight training to launch FAIR DIG. Since then, I’ve also put out a photography and prose collection called COUCHED and a split with MEND MY DRESS writer Neely Bat Chestnut called… DIG MY DRESS. (Get it?!) I also published Aurora Lady’s DON’T HIDE BEHIND YOUR SKIRT, though my role was as an editor and publisher. It’s all her great writing and art design.

 

Is there a definitive moment where you decide on what you should and shouldn’t share with the world, or does it take some serious pondering?

 

This has been and continues to be very difficult to negotiate. It’s been a problem ever since I started performing music, and only got worse in zines, because I could at least hide meanings in song lyrics. I can do that somewhat with poetry and prose, but perzines put everything out there, even if you assign real-life people pseudonyms or gloss over identifying details. That only protects the person from the reading audience who doesn’t know them, it doesn’t protect you from the person you’re writing about recognizing themselves in the text! So I have to consult certain trusted people in my life and have them rein me in. Honestly, it’s why there aren’t more issues of FAIR DIG. I had planned for it to be quarterly. I’ve put out two issues. I’ve published other stuff since, but not a FAIR DIG #3, because I’m wondering how much of the last year of my life to reveal. Still pondering…

 

Listening to your podcast reading of “Guillermo”, you mentioned taking up weight training after leaving Jiu-Jitsu school. Has anything crazy happened with that?

 

Nothing crazy, just the occasional injury. My gym and my coaches take very good care of us, but I’m in my mid-30s with no real athletic background, so when I exert myself too far, my body pays for it. I think the strangest thing for me has been gaining 50 pounds (it’s been during my wife’s pregnancy so I’m blaming it on Couvade syndrome) and losing the momentum I had going in my CrossFit classes. I’ll write about that in FAIR DIG #3, and hopefully FAIR DIG #4 will chronicle my return to “fighting shape” (so to speak).

 

 

Is there anything you’d like I.E. Zine Fest attendees to know before hitting up your booth?

 
That I won’t be there! I’m sorry to miss them. I will have a newborn son in my arms or on the way, so my dear friend Tori Holder will be representing Fair Dig Press, and selling her own great work at the same table. (Hopefully, she’ll have BOWERBIRD available, which has a scene in it that takes place during the events of mine and Neely’s split DIG MY DRESS.) Also, that each of my zines are written to be enjoyed on their own, but there is definitely a through-line in my work. I consider FAIR DIG #1 and #2 a two-part story, but it ends on a cliffhanger that I think COUCHED and DIG MY DRESS kind of fill in. And if you can only buy one thing and want to know what “the best” zine Fair Dig Press has put out, then that is far and away Aurora Lady’s DON’T HIDE BEHIND YOUR SKIRT. I am really proud of having published her story, and that she was the first author that the press worked with. (But not the last…)

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Fair Dig Press.

 

Fair Dig Press is a very interesting name, how did it come about?

 

Thank you, I’m glad it sparks interest! Back when I played music in Phoenix, my photographer friend Jenny Hunter took some publicity photos of me outside an abandoned house. I found a shovel on the ground and posed with it over my shoulder, with one of my lyrics in mind about shovels and holes in the desert in mind. (My songs were… dark.) So I kept that motif in mind when I was trying to come up with a label to slap on my next creative endeavor. I researched idioms and found that “fair dig” is Irish slang for a fight or for a fair punch (like, the opposite of a cheap shot). Since my first zine was about learning to cagefight - or trying to learn before getting injured - it seemed like an appropriate fit. And then when I decided to expand my publishing ambitions beyond just my own writing, and start putting out authors, I decided to keep the name attached to it.

 

Is Fair Dig the first and only zine you have created?  If so when and how did it come about?

 

It is the first I created, though not the first I’ve written for. I wrote submissions for other zines for a while, and did interviews for an alt-comedy zine called MODEST PROPOSAL. I read a lot more zines than I actually wrote for, but a few years back I got involved in promoting L.A. Zine Fest through my podcast Shakeytown Radio, and started volunteering for them. I was inspired to start writing my own zine, and used the story of my fight training to launch FAIR DIG. Since then, I’ve also put out a photography and prose collection called COUCHED and a split with MEND MY DRESS writer Neely Bat Chestnut called… DIG MY DRESS. (Get it?!) I also published Aurora Lady’s DON’T HIDE BEHIND YOUR SKIRT, though my role was as an editor and publisher. It’s all her great writing and art design.

 

Is there a definitive moment where you decide on what you should and shouldn’t share with the world, or does it take some serious pondering?

 

This has been and continues to be very difficult to negotiate. It’s been a problem ever since I started performing music, and only got worse in zines, because I could at least hide meanings in song lyrics. I can do that somewhat with poetry and prose, but perzines put everything out there, even if you assign real-life people pseudonyms or gloss over identifying details. That only protects the person from the reading audience who doesn’t know them, it doesn’t protect you from the person you’re writing about recognizing themselves in the text! So I have to consult certain trusted people in my life and have them rein me in. Honestly, it’s why there aren’t more issues of FAIR DIG. I had planned for it to be quarterly. I’ve put out two issues. I’ve published other stuff since, but not a FAIR DIG #3, because I’m wondering how much of the last year of my life to reveal. Still pondering…

 

Listening to your podcast reading of “Guillermo”, you mentioned taking up weight training after leaving Jiu-Jitsu school. Has anything crazy happened with that?

 

Nothing crazy, just the occasional injury. My gym and my coaches take very good care of us, but I’m in my mid-30s with no real athletic background, so when I exert myself too far, my body pays for it. I think the strangest thing for me has been gaining 50 pounds (it’s been during my wife’s pregnancy so I’m blaming it on Couvade syndrome) and losing the momentum I had going in my CrossFit classes. I’ll write about that in FAIR DIG #3, and hopefully FAIR DIG #4 will chronicle my return to “fighting shape” (so to speak).

 

 

Is there anything you’d like I.E. Zine Fest attendees to know before hitting up your booth?

 

That I won’t be there! I’m sorry to miss them. I will have a newborn son in my arms or on the way, so my dear friend Tori Holder will be representing Fair Dig Press, and selling her own great work at the same table. (Hopefully, she’ll have BOWERBIRD available, which has a scene in it that takes place during the events of mine and Neely’s split DIG MY DRESS.) Also, that each of my zines are written to be enjoyed on their own, but there is definitely a through-line in my work. I consider FAIR DIG #1 and #2 a two-part story, but it ends on a cliffhanger that I think COUCHED and DIG MY DRESS kind of fill in. And if you can only buy one thing and want to know what “the best” zine Fair Dig Press has put out, then that is far and away Aurora Lady’s DON’T HIDE BEHIND YOUR SKIRT. I am really proud of having published her story, and that she was the first author that the press worked with. (But not the last…)

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR:  Jay the Illustrator.
 
 
Please, give us a brief introduction of yourself as an artist.
 
Hi, I’m Jason Harris, I’m an illustrator that focuses on the relationships and connections I have with others. I also ink comics from to time to time.
 
Where do you find inspiration for your illustrations?
 
I would have to say my friends and the relationship I share with them considering most of my art focuses on that aspect of my life.
 
 
 
Is there anything new you’re working on that you’re particularly excited about?
 
For the past year, I have been working on a project that depicts the relationship I have with others. I’m pretty excited with how the new illustrations are coming along. 
 
 
Are there other artists/zinesters who inspire you? Who and why?
 
Shizu Saldamondo, Adrian Tomine, and Julie Delporte. I have always been inspired by how their work is centered on people and the connections they share with them and their visual approach to storytelling. When it comes to Julies’ work I have always been fascinated by the layouts of her comics. It’s not the typical graphic novel style you often come across, but like a visual journal into her life. 
 
 
 
Is there anything else you’d like us to know before visiting your booth at I.E. Zine Fest?
 
This is my first time participating at Zinefest, I look forward to meeting all the other zinesters. Be sure to stop by my table to say hi and get a high five!

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR:  Jay the Illustrator.

 

 

Please, give us a brief introduction of yourself as an artist.

 

Hi, I’m Jason Harris, I’m an illustrator that focuses on the relationships and connections I have with others. I also ink comics from to time to time.

 

Where do you find inspiration for your illustrations?

 

I would have to say my friends and the relationship I share with them considering most of my art focuses on that aspect of my life.

 

 

 

Is there anything new you’re working on that you’re particularly excited about?

 

For the past year, I have been working on a project that depicts the relationship I have with others. I’m pretty excited with how the new illustrations are coming along. 

 

 

Are there other artists/zinesters who inspire you? Who and why?

 

Shizu Saldamondo, Adrian Tomine, and Julie Delporte. I have always been inspired by how their work is centered on people and the connections they share with them and their visual approach to storytelling. When it comes to Julies’ work I have always been fascinated by the layouts of her comics. It’s not the typical graphic novel style you often come across, but like a visual journal into her life. 

 

 

 

Is there anything else you’d like us to know before visiting your booth at I.E. Zine Fest?

 

This is my first time participating at Zinefest, I look forward to meeting all the other zinesters. Be sure to stop by my table to say hi and get a high five!

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Tori Holder
 
Please, tell us a little bit about your zine.

My zines are basically a slightly more narrative version of my sketchbooks, I just draw comics about pretty much everything I think needs to be said..well said with little pictures. I’m also always trying to experiment with the physicality of the medium: what can I add by printing it out as opposed to posting online? how does the page layout pace the story? Is it possible to go past a linear narrative?

Have you considered incorporating photos  in to your zines, or do you choose to keep these two art forms separate?
I included some photos in pieces like AWAY and Little Things, and I’m definitely not opposed to seeing more of my photos in my zines. During the time I was making those pieces, the photographic process was very heavily entwining in that part of my life, and at the present they’re not interacting as much. I’d really like to do some more work with photography fused with zines/ comics in the future though.
Besides being an awesome zinester and photographer, are there any other hobbies or skills you acquire that others don’t really know about? Tap dancing, sword fighting etc?
Nah, I’m a two-trick pony.
What are the best and worst parts about being a zinester?
Best: getting to share your work with others and being exposed to brilliant works that you might otherwise never see. Worst: needing to pee at a zinefest but not wanting to ditch your table. The struggle is real.
Are there other zinesters who influence your work or whom you find particularly inspiring?
So many! Obviously, as I’m serving as a stand-in rep for Fair Dig Press, their zinesters (current and upcoming) are influential, and as anyone who knows Brodie would attest he is basically a tourguide into zineworld. Of course, being someone working in comics-zines, other cartoonist-zinesters are really influential, and I’m constantly trying to tap into the wellspring of brilliant artistic output, positivity, and cute dresses that I classify as “my inner Yumi Sakagawa”. Honestly I could list people for days, but I won’t.
 

GET TO KNOW YOUR VENDOR: Tori Holder

 

Please, tell us a little bit about your zine.


My zines are basically a slightly more narrative version of my sketchbooks, I just draw comics about pretty much everything I think needs to be said..well said with little pictures. I’m also always trying to experiment with the physicality of the medium: what can I add by printing it out as opposed to posting online? how does the page layout pace the story? Is it possible to go past a linear narrative?

Have you considered incorporating photos  in to your zines, or do you choose to keep these two art forms separate?

I included some photos in pieces like AWAY and Little Things, and I’m definitely not opposed to seeing more of my photos in my zines. During the time I was making those pieces, the photographic process was very heavily entwining in that part of my life, and at the present they’re not interacting as much. I’d really like to do some more work with photography fused with zines/ comics in the future though.

Besides being an awesome zinester and photographer, are there any other hobbies or skills you acquire that others don’t really know about? Tap dancing, sword fighting etc?

Nah, I’m a two-trick pony.

What are the best and worst parts about being a zinester?

Best: getting to share your work with others and being exposed to brilliant works that you might otherwise never see. Worst: needing to pee at a zinefest but not wanting to ditch your table. The struggle is real.

Are there other zinesters who influence your work or whom you find particularly inspiring?

So many! Obviously, as I’m serving as a stand-in rep for Fair Dig Press, their zinesters (current and upcoming) are influential, and as anyone who knows Brodie would attest he is basically a tourguide into zineworld. Of course, being someone working in comics-zines, other cartoonist-zinesters are really influential, and I’m constantly trying to tap into the wellspring of brilliant artistic output, positivity, and cute dresses that I classify as “my inner Yumi Sakagawa”. Honestly I could list people for days, but I won’t.